A Draining Experience

We are still getting ready for the big trip and are almost ready. One modification Butch made is to relocate the sewer hose storage. Dumping our waste water and potty water is the least pleasant task when we camp in a self-contained recreational vehicle. We’ll do whatever we can to improve the experience.

If you’re unfamiliar with draining holding tanks or with connecting to sewer outlets, it’s a procedure that requires careful removal of the RV’s sewer hose from its storage to connect to both the RV outlets and the dump station receptacle. For health and environmental reasons, connections must be correct to prevent leakage and contamination. It’s important to follow strict disposal procedures. Also, be sure to use tank deodorizer recommended for your rig following the tank dump.

Our Casita came with a rear bumper in which the sewer hose was stored. Yet the connections are located at the trailer’s front. Butch added a PVC storage tube (purchased at Camping World) to the front.

Now the hose is within easy reach of the sewer outlets. He cleaned the rear bumper thoroughly and now uses it to store the awning poles and tools.

Disposable gloves help with the tank draining process AKA dumping. If you’re new to RVing, dumping tanks gets easier with experience. Take your time and keep your sense of humor. Don’t feel down in the dumps. 😉

All right, campers. Dixie Pixie is packed and ready to head west. Stay tuned!

The Essentials for the Maiden Voyage

Last year, when we traveled to Texas to take delivery of our trailer, we had to pack judiciously for both the hotel stops and our camping. We were limited to the cab and bed of a regular cab pickup truck. We had 1000+ miles to travel … with a new puppy. Preparation was key to a relaxed, fun journey.

Dixie Pixie’s first campsite

Rockin’ “A” RV Park, Vernon, TX

Before the trip, Butch installed a cover for the pickup bed to protect items from the weather. This cover increased our storage so we could transport chairs and plastic storage containers for our camping necessities. We tried to think of everything we’d need on our first few days of Casita ownership.

Alas, we made numerous trips to the Vernon, Texas, Walmart for the items we didn’t pack and for groceries we couldn’t bring. Fortunately, the Walmart is located next door–within walking distance–of Rockin’ “A” RV Park and the Walmart trips enabled us to earn steps on our fitness trackers.

Here’s a list of what we brought and wished we brought. We have more on board now. These were bare essentials for starting out. I hope the list helps newbie campers. (If you don’t travel with pets, you can ignore our dog items)

  • Clothes for 5 days
  • Pet food, water, toys, treats, and crate
  • Essential medications and toiletries
  • Tools (Butch keeps basic tools in his truck’s toolbox)
  • RV toilet paper
  • Paper towels, plates, cups, and napkins (at least enough for a week)
  • Flatware (stainless. I don’t like plastic utensils)
  • Kitchen tools (i.e. spatula, can opener, knife, vegetable peeler)
  • Cookware *
  • Teakettle for boiling water (we’re tea drinkers, both hot and iced)
  • Two large bath towels, two hand towels, and a dishcloth
  • 2 pillows
  • 2 sleeping bags (our preference. Take bed linens if you want)
  • Whisk broom, disinfectant wipes, baby wipes
  • Small bottles of hand soap, dish soap
  • A zippered storage bag of laundry pods and dryer sheets.
  • Holding tank treatment
  • Our electronics and rechargers
  • Two folding lawn chairs

*I have a small set of stainless steel cookware perfect for RVs that nests for storage. It also has a griddle that doubles as a toaster. Although I added a 3 quart mini Instant Pot and an air fryer since that trip, this basic set enabled me to cook well-rounded meals.

Rice, Texas, at the Casita factory

I didn’t include grocery items. We picked up salt, pepper, butter, and food for meals during our first Walmart visit.

If you have suggestions to add to the list, please leave a comment.