Camp Driveway, anyone?

The global Coronavirus quarantine got you down? Is cabin fever consuming you? Then consider this (I can’t take credit for the idea. It came from a Facebook group of fiberglass trailer enthusiasts): #Campdriveway.

Here’s the idea: Let’s have a huge, cross-country, cross-continent Pod Rally. We can name it CAMP DRIVEWAY.
Anyone who has their camper at home, let’s do a sleep-in on Saturday, March 28. We would have the potential of being the biggest rally ever! (For those who don’t have their camper at home, join us anyway!)

It will be so much fun to post pictures of you and your families on social media enjoying this nationwide, continent wide event.


Are you in? See you all next Saturday, March 28! #CAMPDRIVEWAY

#CampDriveway

A Draining Experience

We are still getting ready for the big trip and are almost ready. One modification Butch made is to relocate the sewer hose storage. Dumping our waste water and potty water is the least pleasant task when we camp in a self-contained recreational vehicle. We’ll do whatever we can to improve the experience.

If you’re unfamiliar with draining holding tanks or with connecting to sewer outlets, it’s a procedure that requires careful removal of the RV’s sewer hose from its storage to connect to both the RV outlets and the dump station receptacle. For health and environmental reasons, connections must be correct to prevent leakage and contamination. It’s important to follow strict disposal procedures. Also, be sure to use tank deodorizer recommended for your rig following the tank dump.

Our Casita came with a rear bumper in which the sewer hose was stored. Yet the connections are located at the trailer’s front. Butch added a PVC storage tube (purchased at Camping World) to the front.

Now the hose is within easy reach of the sewer outlets. He cleaned the rear bumper thoroughly and now uses it to store the awning poles and tools.

Disposable gloves help with the tank draining process AKA dumping. If you’re new to RVing, dumping tanks gets easier with experience. Take your time and keep your sense of humor. Don’t feel down in the dumps. 😉

All right, campers. Dixie Pixie is packed and ready to head west. Stay tuned!

A Basket Case

Storage in the Dixie Pixie is limited, so it’s important to utilize every square foot of space efficiently. That’s where baskets come into play.

We didn’t spend a fortune at IKEA to compartmentalize our belongings. Walmart, Amazon, or Dollar General carry all we needed to create modular storage.

As our Dixie Pixie bounces along behind us on the highways, her contents can shift, roll, and fall. Baskets not only offer storage solutions but keep our belongings reasonably secure. I even bought small baskets for our refrigerator. We will probably add baskets or reorganize as we travel, but we feel ready for our upcoming trip.

Have Dog, Will Travel

Traveling with pets is one of the advantages of camping. We RV with Nova, our one-year old Shihtzu, and she’s a good traveler. We have a Kurgo pet seat in the cab of the truck, complete with safety belt to attach to her harness. She sits high between our two seats, which gives her a good view. She has enough room to curl up for naps, too.

She also has a Nylabone chew and a stuffed toy in her Kurgo. ( Kurgo products are available on Amazon.com.)

I carry a large bag, sort of like a diaper bag, complete with treats, food, baby wipes, plastic gloves for picking up poop, a Tupperware bowl filled with drinking water, and any medicine she might need. The bag goes with us to the Casita when we set up camp.

Dogs love routine, so we keep to her regular schedule as much as possible. We bring her crate from home so she’s sleeping in the same bed at night.

It’s important to observe common courtesy and safety rules, including:

  • Keep your dog leashed unless in a fenced dog park or run.
  • Keep your dog secured with a safety belt while traveling. A loose dog may be a dead dog in a crash or sudden stop.
  • Always pick up dog poop and dispose properly (many parks, campgrounds, and rest stops have designated areas for dog waste disposal.)
  • Never leave your pet alone in the vehicle unless you leave air conditioning running, and then only leave them briefly.
  • Don’t leave your dog tied up outside your RV.
  • Give your dog water frequently, especially in warmer weather, to avoid dehydration.
  • Don’t leave your dog unattended for long periods. It’s not fair to the animal or your neighbors, especially if your dog is a barker.
  • Obey all campground pet rules. Don’t try to take your fur baby into buildings that are off-limits to animals.

Some attractions offer dog kennels for visitors, although we haven’t used those. A growing number of stores allow you to bring your dog. Also some fast-food restaurants offer outdoor seating where you can take your dog.

I hope you enjoy travel with your pet as much as we do.